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2022 Astronomical Events

*Not all events are visible from St. John

June 14: Strawberry Moon

June’s Full Moon is often called the Strawberry Full Moon, after the berries that grow in the Northern Hemisphere around this time of the year. In 2022, it is also a Supermoon.

What is a Supermoon?

June 16: Mercury at Greatest Elongation West

This might be a good time to try and spot Mercury: the planet appears at its farthest distance from the Sun in the morning sky.

Find Mercury with our Interactive Night Sky Map 

June 21: June Solstice

This solstice is the summer solstice in the Northern Hemisphere, where it is the longest day of the year. In the Southern Hemisphere, it’s the winter solstice and the shortest day of the year.

June 29: New Moon

Make the most of a moonlight-free night to look for some stars and planets in the skies. This month’s New Moon is also a Micromoon.

What is a Micromoon?

July 4: Earth’s Aphelion

At 07:10 UTC, the Earth will reach its aphelion—the point on its orbit farthest from the Sun.

July 13: Full Buck Moon

July’s Full Moon is known as the Buck Moon, Thunder Moon, Hay Moon, and Wort Moon. The Buck Moon for 2022 is also a Supermoon.

What is a Supermoon? 

July 28: New Moon

The New Moon phase is the best time to explore the night sky. Find planets, stars, and constellations using our Interactive Night Sky Map!

August 12: Sturgeon Moon

August’s Full Moon is traditionally called the Sturgeon Moon. Other names include the Green Corn Moon, Barley Moon, Fruit Moon, and Grain Moon.

Traditional Full Moon names

August 12-13: Perseid Meteors

The Perseid meteor shower is usually one of the most active and brightest meteor showers of the year. Alas, in 2022 the peak nights are around the time of Full Moon, which means many meteors will be lost in its bright glare.

Check the weather          https://www.timeanddate.com/scripts/go.php?type=hourly

What is a meteor shower?

August 14: Saturn at Opposition

The ringed planet, Saturn, lies on the opposite side of Earth to the Sun, and is visible from sunset to sunrise.

Find Saturn with our Interactive Night Sky Map

August 27: New Moon

Dark nights a few days before and after the Moon reaches its New Moon phase at 08:17 UTC on August 27 are the best nights to do some night sky watching.

August 27: Mercury at Greatest Elongation East

This might be a good time to try and spot Mercury: the planet appears at its farthest distance from the Sun in the evening sky.

Find Mercury with our Interactive Night Sky Map

September 10: Harvest Moon

In many Native American cultures, September’s Full Moon is called the Full Corn Moon. This year, it is also the Full Moon closest to the September equinox, making it 2022’s Harvest Moon as well.

How to take pictures of the Full Moon

September 23: September Equinox

Also known as the autumnal (fall) equinox in the Northern Hemisphere, the September Equinox is considered by many as the first day of fall.

September equinox celebrations around the world.

September 25: New Moon

A New Moon in the sky means no moonlight to hinder your view of stars and planets. Use the Interactive Night Sky Map to find out what planets are visible tonight and where.

September 26: Jupiter at Opposition

The largest planet in the solar system, Jupiter, lies opposite the Sun in the sky, and is visible all night.

Find Jupiter with our Interactive Night Sky Map

October 8: Mercury at Greatest Elongation West

This might be a good time to try and spot Mercury: the planet appears at its farthest distance from the Sun in the morning sky.

Find Mercury with our Interactive Night Sky Map

October 8-9: Draconid Meteor Shower

The best time to see the shooting stars of the peaking Draconids is just after nightfall.

Check the weather

October 9: Hunter’s Moon

The October Full Moon is traditionally called the Hunter’s Moon. October is a time to start preparing for the coming winter by hunting or slaughtering animals and preserving meat.

How to take pictures of the Full Moon

October 21-22: Orionid Meteor Shower

The Orionids are the second meteor shower in October. The shower peaks on October 21-22 but usually remains active between October 2 and November 7. The best time to see these shooting stars is just after midnight and before the Sun rises.

Check sunrise times

October 25: Partial Solar Eclipse

This eclipse will be visible from most of Europe, northern Africa, the Middle East, and western parts of Asia—if the weather permits.

October 25: New Moon

The New Moon phase is the best time to explore the night sky. Find planets, stars, and constellations using our Interactive Night Sky Map!

November 7-8: Total Lunar Eclipse

The entire Moon will plunge into the Earth’s umbra, the central, dark portion of its shadow. This total lunar eclipse will be visible from North and South America, Australia, Asia, and parts of Europe.

November 8: Full Moon / Beaver Moon

November’s Full Moon is traditionally called a Beaver Moon, after beavers that build their dams during this time of the year.

Can you see the far side of the Moon?

November 17-18: Leonid Meteor Shower

The Leonids’ shooting stars are visible between November 6 and 30, and peak on the night of November 17 and early morning of November 18, with up to 15 meteors per hour.

Check the weather

November 23: New Moon

The New Moon phase is the best time to explore the night sky. Find planets, stars, and constellations using our Interactive Night Sky Map!

December 8: Mars at Opposition

At opposition, Mars lies on the opposite side of Earth to the Sun, and shines red in the sky all night.

Find Mars with our Interactive Night Sky Map

December 8: Full Cold Moon

One of the traditional names for the Full Moon in December is Cold Moon.

How to take pictures of the Full Moon

December 13-14: Geminid Meteors

One of the best meteor showers of the year, the Geminids peak on the night of December 13 and early morning hours of December 14, but will be visible from December 4-20.

How to see a meteor shower

December 21: December Solstice

The December solstice will take place at 21:48 UTC. Also known as the winter solstice, it is the shortest day of the year in the Northern Hemisphere. In the Southern Hemisphere, it is the longest day of the year and is called the summer solstice.

What causes seasons?

December 21: Mercury at Greatest Elongation East

This might be a good time to try and spot Mercury: the planet appears at its farthest distance from the Sun in the evening sky.

Find Mercury with our Interactive Night Sky Map.

December 22-23: Ursid Meteors

Catch the shooting stars of the last major meteor shower of the year, the Ursids, when it peaks in the night between December 22 and 23.

What is a meteor shower?

December 23: Super New Moon

This New Moon takes place very close to its perigee—the point on its orbit closest to the Earth.

 


More! Windspree has more information about the amazing sky in the calendar of even more astrological events and a list of eclipses, both solar and lunar, as well as a full moon schedule for the current calendar year. Check it out and choose the best dates to visit Coral Bay, St. John!


If you’re interested in booking St. John Virgin Islands rentals, the best resource is Windspree Vacation Homes, renting Virgin Islands vacation rentals for over 30 years. Book your St. John vacation rental from people who live there and know the island best! For more information on Virgin Islands rentals and St. John USVI rentals, checkout Windspree.com and call or text (340)201-3002.

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